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1. Text messages are considered records If an organisation uses text messaging or any other instantaneous, non-sequential electronic communication mechanism to conduct business, e.g. social media, these communications are considered records under the Public Records Act 2005. As such, they must be managed accordingly. 2. Core guidance Organisations constantly balance the concerns of providin...
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A checksum is a computer-generated string of numbers and letters that act as a digital fingerprint for a digital object. Even the smallest change to a digital object will cause its checksum to change completely. Checksums are a tool for ensuring the integrity of digital objects was created. An unchanged checksum indicates that no change has occurred to the object's data since the checksum w...
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Checksums are digital fingerprints that show if a record is changed or corrupted.  Learn how to use checksums to ensure the integrity of your digital records. Checksums overview Learn when public sector organisations need to use checksums and how to use them The importance of checksums Checksum tools, assessing how well your organisation is set up to use checksums and links to more resources
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This copyright work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand licence. You are free to copy, distribute and adapt the work, if you attribute the work to Archives New Zealand, Department of Internal Affairs and abide by the other licence terms. For more information view the Creative Commons website. 1.1 Introduction This guide is designed to assist public offices and loc...
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1. Introduction Under the Contract and Commercial Law Act 2017 (CCLA) and the Public Records Act 2005 (PRA), public offices and local authorities have conditions to meet before destroying the source information after converting to electronic form - referred to in this Guide as digitisation. This guide explains how to create electronic information of sufficient quality to replace the source inf...
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1. Introduction In the context of information and records, disposal means the decision-making processes for retaining, transferring or destroying information and records. Section 4 of the Public Records Act 2005 (PRA) outlines the types of possible disposal actions. These are transfer of control, sale, alteration, destruction, or discharge. 2. Getting and using authorised approval Public offi...
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1. Introduction The two main ways for public offices to dispose of information and records they no longer require are to transfer them to Archives New Zealand or, if they have no long term value, destroy them. Before doing so however, the correct statutory process for disposal must be followed. This guide provides an overview of the transfer of physical and digital information and records unde...
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1. Introduction Sentencing is the process of applying a disposal authority and its disposal actions across your organisation’s information and records. A disposal authority provides a ‘sentence’ that specifies the minimum amount of time information and records need to be kept before being approved by the administrative head or delegated Executive Sponsor for disposal. 2. How to sentence Sente...
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1. Managing the digital transfer process We manage digital transfers on a case-by-case basis and in stages. These stages are: Transfer initiation Transfer planning Transfer preparation Transfer Post-transfer We take a modular and iterative approach to guidance development as our tools and methods continue to evolve. Existing and new guidance material will be linked to each stage to assist with...
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The most common ways for a regulated organisation to dispose of records are to transfer the records to our archives or, if the records have no long term value, they can be destroyed. The Public Records Act 2005 (PRA) mandates the transfer of public records of long-term value that have been in existence for 25 years. They must be transferred either into our possession or, to a repository appr...
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Guiding principles for identifying and assessing the value of information and records. Version 1 of this Statement has been updated and replaced by version 2. If you have already started the appraisal process using version 1, you should continue to do so. Version 1 is available here. 1. Our role The Chief Archivist has a legislative responsibility under the Public Records Act 2005 (the Act), t...
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1. Context We have developed methods for processing digital information and records into the Government Digital Archive and making them accessible through Archway, our archival management system. However, current system limitations mean that digital information and records need to have certain characteristics in order to be transferred successfully. If a public sector organisation considers th...
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