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1. Introduction Information and records are at the core of business and are a key strategic asset. This document sets out what physical records include, how to keep and maintain physical records, and using a storage plan. Section 17 of the Public Records Act 2005 (PRA) states that: a public office must maintain all public records that it controls a local authority must maintain all protect...
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1 Introduction 1.1 Protected Records These explanatory notes have been produced to provide guidance in the application of the List of Protected Records for Local Authorities (the “List”) published as a Supplement to the New Zealand Gazette, 28 August 2013, No. 117, page 3123. They provide more detail around the kinds of records that fall into the classes of the “List”. Note: Under section 40 (3...
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A checksum is a computer-generated string of numbers and letters that act as a digital fingerprint for a digital object. Even the smallest change to a digital object will cause its checksum to change completely. Checksums are a tool for ensuring the integrity of digital objects was created. An unchanged checksum indicates that no change has occurred to the object's data since the checksum w...
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1. Introduction An information and records management policy is a statement of intent for managing corporate information and records appropriately. It shows that the organisation is committed to a successful information and records management programme – one that complies and is reliable, systematic and well managed. The policy demonstrates to employees and stakeholders the value of business i...
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1. Text messages are considered records If an organisation uses text messaging or any other instantaneous, non-sequential electronic communication mechanism to conduct business, e.g. social media, these communications are considered records under the Public Records Act 2005. As such, they must be managed accordingly. 2. Core guidance Organisations constantly balance the concerns of providin...
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1 Introduction 1.1 Mandate This instruction is issued under section 40(2) of the Public Records Act 2005 (the Act). Protected records are local authority information and records declared by the Chief Archivist under section 40(1) to be protected for the purposes of the Act. Under section 40(2) of the Act a local authority must provide for the adequate protection and preservation of protected i...
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1. Introduction An instruction to Approved Repositories for physical (non-digital) archives. 1.1 Mandate This instruction is issued under section 26(2)(c) of the Public Records Act 2005. Public archives are public records under the control of the Chief Archivist. Approved repositories are bodies authorised to accept the deposit of public archives for safekeeping. Under section 26(2)(c) of ...
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In our Wellington archive we hold thousands of photographs and art works created by and for the New Zealand Government. These include oil paintings, water colours, drawings, prints and posters, as well as several thousand photographic images. These records are held in various formats and can be difficult to access. These research guides provide information about the major collections of photogr...
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Transfer to Archives NZ, or an approved repository, is one of the most common ways public sector organisations dispose of records.  Get guidance on the process, both for physical and digital records. Transfer process Guidance on the requirements and processes for transferring public records to Archives NZ, along with transfer during administrative change Digital transfer - Overview Find out...
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1 Our role The Chief Archivist has a primary statutory role through the Public Records Act 2005 (the Act) to lead public sector information and records management. A necessary part of this legislative responsibility is the provision of an integrated regulatory framework for the systematic creation, management, disposal and preservation of public sector information (including data) and records. ...
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1. Introduction The two main ways for public offices to dispose of information and records they no longer require are to transfer them to Archives New Zealand or, if they have no long term value, destroy them. Before doing so however, the correct statutory process for disposal must be followed. This guide provides an overview of the transfer of physical and digital information and records unde...
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